Knowledge base tag results

This short document gives many useful informations on blindness and sight loss. People with no previous knowledge can read this article without difficulty.

This information was developed by the National Eye Institute to help patients and their families search for general information about age-related macular degeneration. An eye care professional who has examined the patient's eyes and is familiar with his or her medical history is the best person to answer specific questions.

This article explains what are the different conditions and diseases that affect vision as we get older. It also provides tips to drive safely and describes the different devices that can be used to deal with visual impairment.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration or breakdown of the eye's macula. The macula is a small area in the retina — the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The macula is the part of the retina that is responsible for your central vision, allowing you to see fine details clearly.

The Method Specialist Care was created to map the wishes of the inhabitants of De Vlasborch, a home for the visually impaired elderly. Next to that the method will equip the employees of Royal Dutch Visio.

Antiangiogenic treatments have led to spectacular improvements in a significant percentage of patients with neovascular (or “wet”) age-related macular degeneration. How can these results be interpreted in terms of vision rehabilitation? Which proportion of patients improve their vision following these treatments? Do they actually regain normal vision? What is the impact of these treatments when the vision impairment is already severe?

There are several inconveniences that can affect vision : metamorphopsia, photophobia, scotomas, night blindness, visual hallucinations, occasional loss of vision, mirages, altered perception of colours, visual fatigue or “dryness” syndromes.

Our information on individual eye conditions is medically checked and is designed to be as useful as possible. We have grouped them, in alphabetical order, into three groups: names beginning with A to C, D to N and O to Z to make them easier to find quickly. Click here If you wish to use this information for patients and clients, you will find that each page has a link to a printable version. Please feel free to print and photocopy as many copies of the information as you may need

This paper on sensory changes addresses common changes seen with old age and the disease states and injury that occurs more frequently in aging and that impact the sensory system.

Vision loss among the elderly is a major health care problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65. The most common causes of vision loss among the elderly are age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataract and diabetic retinopathy.

The online magazine NIH Medline Plus, a publication of the National Institutes of Health and the Friends of of the National Library of Medicine, published a webpage explaining the different visual impairments people can suffer from.

The purpose of this literature review is to provide information about the eye health care needs of older adults. Age-related eye diseases and conditions are the most important drivers for the various types of eye health care required by older adults.

This paper presents estimates of the prevalence of visual impairment and its causes in 2002, based on the best available evidence derived from recent studies. Estimates were determined from data on low vision and blindness as defined in the International statistical classification of diseases, injuries and causes of death.

This report explores the levels of vision and hearing impairments among the elderly, the changes in those levels over the last decade, common devices and procedures used to reduce the impact of these impairments, and the potential for future reductions.