Knowledge base tag results

Ms Marie Chantal Wanet (INLB) Presentation at the 3rd International SensAge Conference, 23 June 2014: Promoting Active Participation By Ageing People with Sensory Disabilities. Please click at the powerpoint presentation below to view the presentation.

This information was developed by the National Eye Institute to help patients and their families search for general information about age-related macular degeneration. An eye care professional who has examined the patient's eyes and is familiar with his or her medical history is the best person to answer specific questions.

The efficiency of the sensory organs—vision, hearing, taste, smell, and touch—declines with age, but the age of onset and rate of decline differ markedly among people. This publication explains the sensory changes older people experience and suggests what you can do to help.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration or breakdown of the eye's macula. The macula is a small area in the retina — the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The macula is the part of the retina that is responsible for your central vision, allowing you to see fine details clearly.

Various forms and degrees of visual impairment and functional deficits may occur in patients with age related macular degeneration (ARMD). [etc.] To view the content, please visit the full-text article (read below).

Antiangiogenic treatments have led to spectacular improvements in a significant percentage of patients with neovascular (or “wet”) age-related macular degeneration. How can these results be interpreted in terms of vision rehabilitation? Which proportion of patients improve their vision following these treatments? Do they actually regain normal vision? What is the impact of these treatments when the vision impairment is already severe?

Rehabilitation of reading in older individuals with macular degeneration: A review of effective training programs. Please, click the pdf-file at the bottom, to read the fullt text article.

Macular degeneration (MD) is the most common cause of visual impairment among older adults in Western Europe. It severely affects reading performance. We considered several training programs that aim to improve peripheral reading. There was no strong support in favor of one particular training method for rehabilitation of reading in macular degeneration, but there is evidence that older individuals with macular degeneration can be trained to improve reading performance.

The online magazine NIH Medline Plus, a publication of the National Institutes of Health and the Friends of of the National Library of Medicine, published a webpage explaining the different visual impairments people can suffer from.