Knowledge base tag results

Various forms and degrees of visual impairment and functional deficits may occur in patients with age related macular degeneration (ARMD). [etc.] To view the content, please visit the full-text article (read below).

Antiangiogenic treatments have led to spectacular improvements in a significant percentage of patients with neovascular (or “wet”) age-related macular degeneration. How can these results be interpreted in terms of vision rehabilitation? Which proportion of patients improve their vision following these treatments? Do they actually regain normal vision? What is the impact of these treatments when the vision impairment is already severe?

Vision loss among the elderly is a major health care problem. Approximately one person in three has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65. The most common causes of vision loss among the elderly are age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataract and diabetic retinopathy.

The online magazine NIH Medline Plus, a publication of the National Institutes of Health and the Friends of of the National Library of Medicine, published a webpage explaining the different visual impairments people can suffer from.

Instead of applying the usual longitudinal methods to assess the outcome of low-vision rehabilitation services in terms of vision-related quality of life, a three-level Item Response Theory (IRT) method was proposed.

The Visual Functioning Questionnaire (VFQ-25) is one of the most widely used measures of vision-related quality of life. However, the questionnaire does not meet some psychometric quality criteria. The objectives of this study were first to obtain the factor structure of the VFQ-25, and second, to obtain interval scales by Rasch analysis.