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On the occasion of the World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, AGE co-organised a high-level seminar addressing the issue of older people’s human rights in the area of long-term care. The event presented two new relevant EU initiatives and discussed how to strengthen legal protection of older people in need of care and assistance and safeguard dignity in old age.

A web site that aims to be an information base and a learning resource about how it is to live with impaired vision and / or hearing. It shows examples of measures that can be implemented and how the environment can relate to visual and hearing impairments to improve conditions both physically and socially. The web site is aimed at staff working in elderly care, but it can also be used by people who have vision and / or hearing impairment.

This webpage provides a list of assistive devices to allow elderly people to have an as independent life as they can, including vision and hearing assistive devices among many others.

As individuals age, it is common to experience changes in sensory perceptions—vision, hearing, smell, etc. Modifying one’s home environment to compensate for sensory loss can assist the older adult in maximizing their independence and ability to age in place. First, it is important to understand how the environment is perceived and negotiated by the older person.

This survey seeks to analyse the process of population ageing in depth. It is the first study to examine the different ways in which people aged 50 and older live in 20 European countries.

This study is intended to contribute to existing research on long-term psychosocial adaptation to age-related vision loss.

This brochure seeks to explain what can be done to create an age-friendly EU by fostering solidarity between generations and enabling the active participation and involvement of all age groups in society while providing them with adequate support and protection.

This publication was developed in the framework of the WeDO project by the European Partnership for the Wellbeing and Dignity of Older people. WeDO is a European project (2010-2012) co-financed by the European Commission. It was led by a steering group composed of 18 partners from 12 European Union (EU) Member States interested in working together to improve the quality of life of older people in need of care and assistance.

Main topics - The impact of vision loss at old age - Social support and loneliness - Building and maintaining a personal network

The purpose of this brochure is to illustrate, through the presentation of existing good practice and more general considerations for policy making, how commitments of the 2012 Vienna Ministerial Declaration relate to various societal situations and can be successfully implemented in terms of concrete policies and actions. The examples and Proposals have all been selected from contributions to the Vienna conference.

This press release published on the Parliament's Magazine Regional Review introduces the European Thematic Network on Assistive Information project. The ETNA Network will implement, over a period of 3 years, a European Web Portal providing unified access to all ICT AT resources available on the Web in relation to the needs of all stakeholders, involved as AT users, professionals, developers and policy-makers.

This publication aims to provide examples of better palliative care practices for older people. Some examples consider how to improve aspects within the whole health system; specific examples consider how to improve palliative care education, support in the community, in hospitals or for specific groups of people. The publication is intended for policy-makers, decision-makers, planners and multidisciplinary professionals.

There are a number of opportunities for local and regional actors to access EU funding for innovative projects around ageing issues but often information is difficult to find and it is the purpose of this brochure to facilitate this process.

Care for elderly in home takes a lot of planning. Whatever way it happens, it may involve big changes in life style, and it's best to plan for in advance, if possible. Care may take place in their own home (perhaps with home healthcare services too), or your elderly loved one may be moving in with someone else (perhaps you). Here is a list of tips and ideas to improve the quality of life of these elderly people.

This report highlights the main policies related to active ageing and the policy fields, health, work and retirement, where ICT-based services will be determinant. It is published by the European Commission-Joint Research Centre-Institute for Prospective Technological Studies

The present article provides an overviews a 2004 initiative called EQUAL (Extend Quality of Life). EQUAL was concerned with a better understanding of the interactions between health, diet, and lifestyle; and the development of better technologies for healthy ageing. It was to address neighbourhood and individual security, improved leisure, and learning and financial services, as well as to help older people remain fit and active for as long as possible.

Objectives. We investigated the health, activity, and social participation of people aged 70 years or older with vision impairment, hearing loss, or both.

Purpose: The authors investigate the impact of hearing loss on quality of life in a large population of older adults.

Vision and hearing impairments are among the most common age-related conditions affecting the elderly. There is an emerging literature regarding the profound functional, social, and physical and mental health consequences of either a vision or hearing impairment in later life.

This Communication "Towards a Europe for all Ages" constitutes the contribution of the Commission to the UN International Year of Older Persons. It aims to stimulate debate between and with Member States. It sets out the implications of the ageing of the population in employment, social protection, health and social services and proposes a strategy for effective policy responses in these fields.

We have particular concerns for elderly Deaf people. Although the Deaf Community is a powerful support system for Deaf people throughout their lives, it is a small community and one which requires participation.