"Visual pathologies "

Presbyopia is the loss of the ability of the eye to focus or accommodate close-up vision in order to see clearly. Without any optical correction, the presbyopic sees objects in the distance well but those which are close up poorly.
The symptoms are of variable intensity depending on the lifestyle and/or work and leisures of the person.
Presbyopia is detected during an ophthalmologic examination.
The treatment can consist of using eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery.

What is presbyopia?
Presbyopia is the loss of the ability of the eye to focus or accommodate itself to see close-up objects clearly.
Without any optical correction, the presbyopic eye sees objects in the distance well but those which are close up poorly.

Presbyopia is a natural ageing process of the eye. The crystalline is most affected because, increasing its volume throughout life, it loses its flexibility and capacity to alter its curvature, therefore reducing the refractive power of the eye.

What are the symptoms for presbyopia?
The symptoms are of variable intensity depending on the lifestyle and/or work and leisures of the person:
There is a need to stretch the arms in order to read. It is the “arms not long enough” feeling.
Sometimes it is necessary to increase the lighting to see clearly up close.
Finally, when also affected by myopia, it is sometimes necessary to remove the corrective lenses to see clearly up close.
For some, the feeling is worse in the morning (difficult start) and the other later in evening (fatigue due to adaptation efforts).

More rarely, one can observe signs of eye strain such as headaches due to close up adaptation efforts. This more likely reflects the need for lenses that correct myopia or a need for orthoptics (difficulty with eye movements).

How is it diagnosed?
Presbyopia is detected during an ophthalmologic examination organised at the ophthalmologist's following symptoms or during a GP or occupational doctor examination.
How does presbyopia evolve?
It is physiological, starting around the age of 45, followed by a period of increase, finally stabilising around 60. If it starts later, it evolves faster and stabilises around 60 years old.

How is the treatment of presbyopia monitored?
The monitoring of the treatment of presbyopia requires regular assessments, either when the symptoms appear, either during scheduled appointments. For “normal” presbyopias, which start around 45 and continue to evolve until the age of 60, the rate for these assessments is every 3 to 5 years.

What treatments are available for presbyopia?
The treatment is an optical correction. It can be done:
• using corrective lenses:
- either “full” glasses: make long-distance vision difficult.
- either “half-moon” glasses: good long-distance vision “over the top”.
- either progressive lenses: permit both good distance and close-up vision. It is easier to adapt to the correction if it is worn in the earlier stages of the presbyopia. If getting used to the correction is difficult, do not hesitate to visit your optician to make some adjustments and the ophthalmologist for a more comfortable viewing.
• using contact lenses: rigid or flexible or hard and correcting presbyopia. It is necessary to test them to ensure good near and distance visual acuity and the compliance of the cornea with the lens. They do not replace the need for eye glasses, which are always required when the lenses are not worn.
• surgically: different techniques exist but it remains exceptional. For more information, you can contact your ophthalmologist, who will be best able to explain the different techniques and whether or not they are appropriate.

Date: 10/25/2012
Author: Sylvie ERVE
Organization: centich
Reference: http://www.guide-vue.fr/la-vue-par-theme/la-vue-apres-45-ans/la-presbytie, http://www.ophtalmologie.fr/presbytie.html
Only for Members: No
Content type: Good practises
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Categories: Medical & Functions, Eye - Vision impairment

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